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University of Leicester, School of Arts (and online)
Call for papers deadline: 31 October 2022
Conference: 20-22 April 2023


Our proposed conference seeks to create an interdisciplinary meeting point for academic and artistic explorations of both US and British Latinidades, and to inspire and facilitate dialogue around key issues and foci for Latinx Studies and identities in the UK. For the event, we wish to create a diverse programme that engenders interactions between established knowledge and critical approaches from US Latinx Studies and the still-burgeoning UK field, and to provide opportunities for the showcasing of current research in these areas by UK-based scholars (on both US and UK Latinx-focused topics) and Latinx creative arts in the UK.

We therefore invite contributions on any aspect of Latinx Studies and cultures, such as (but certainly not exclusively!):
•Examinations/readings/presentations of UK/US Latinx creative works in literature, poetry, art, music, film
•Latinx identity politics in the UK/US, in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability
•The history of British Latinxs
•The history of Latinx Studies
•The American/British/Latinx Dream
•What does the field of British Latinx Studies need to look like/achieve? 
•What lessons can British Latinx Studies take from US Latinx Studies’ key foci/theories & approaches/activities? What changes will need to be made to establish a field of British Latinx Studies that accounts for and responds to identity politics in the UK context?

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Denise Soler Cox. Denise is the US-based creator of Project Eñye, which she established with the aim of ‘transform[ing] how we think and speak about culture, identity and what it means to belong’ as US Latinxs. Denise will be presenting a keynote paper as part of the conference proceedings, and on the final day of the event will introduce a screening of her award-winning documentary Being Eñye (2016), which explores contemporary Latinx identities in the USA. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Denise. 

Professor Cathy McIlwaine. Cathy is Professor of Geography at King’s College London. She has worked for several decades on issues of gender, poverty and violence in cities of the global South, and in London – here with a specific focus on the Latin American community from the perspective of livelihoods and gender-based violence. She has published widely, including 12 books and over 40 journal papers. Cathy has worked with policy-makers at the World Bank, at the Inter-American Development Bank, and at UN-Habitat; with migrant and human rights organisations in London as both collaborator and trustee (Carila Latin American Welfare Association, Latin American Women’s Rights Service, Latin Elephant and Latin America Bureau), and with artists through the “Visual and Embodied Methodologies” network at King’s.

PARTICIPATION COSTS
These costs will cover participation in the event, entrance to screenings, lunches and refreshments for the 3 days: 
General fee: £80
Concession fee (students, unemployed, international residents, artists): £60
PG Bursaries: with thanks to the IMLR we can fund 3 postgraduate student bursaries for participation in the conference, to cover attendance fee and contribute towards travel and accommodation, up to £150 each. If you wish to apply for one of these, please include with your paper proposal a detailed breakdown of anticipated costs, details of any other funding of which you are in receipt, and a short personal statement indicating how attending this conference will benefit your academic career. Awards will be decided by a University of Leicester School of Arts academic committee.

PRESENTATION PROPOSALS
Please send max. 200-word abstracts for 20-minute papers/presentations to Dr Emma Staniland at els15@leicester.ac.uk, by Monday 31 October 2022:

Name:
Affiliation:
Title of 20 minute paper/work:
200-word abstract/proposal:

REGISTRATION will open in January 2023 – please check the conference website at https://le.ac.uk/modern-languages/events for further updates and details. 


Supported by an IMLR Conference Grant